International Archives and Archivists Weekly News Roundup – April 29, 2016

Our weekly roundup of archives-related news from around the globe

  • Reliving history: 250 volunteers transcribed Straits Settlements Records as part of the Citizen Archivist Project (Asia One, April 8, 2016) – “Every day stories about leaking roofs, petty squabbles and rice and ghee rations may be mundane, but the Straits Settlement Records (SSR) are also a treasure trove of historical information about British colonial rule in Singapore.”
  • Ukraine prepares to make Soviet KGB archives available online (EuroMaiden, April 11, 2016) – “While the Czech Republic is about to publish an internet database of 300 thousand scanned communist-era security service documents, Ukraine is undergoing a revision of its KGB archives in order to create, like the Czech Republic, a single open-access archive – The National Memory Archive.”
  • Israel’s state archivist opens up about censorship, digitization (927, April 13, 2016) – “Israel’s state archivist confirms that nearly half a million pages have been sent to the IDF Censor, which has redacted historical documents that already saw the light of day, and talks about why he didn’t foresee the storm that erupted over his decision to end access to paper documents.”
  • The shock of the new: ESB throws open its archive (Independent, April 23, 2016) – “The fascinating 90-year history of the ESB, which helped bring Ireland into the modern age, has been painstakingly catalogued in an electrifying new website.”
  • During WWII, European refugees fled to Syria. Here’s what the camps were like (GlobalPost, April 26, 2016) – “The archival record provides limited information on the demographics of World War II refugee camps in the Middle East. The information that is available, however, shows that camp officials expected the camps to shelter more refugees over time. Geographic information on location of camps come from records of the International Social Service, American Branch records, in the Social Welfare History Archives at the University of Minnesota.”
  • Notre Dame and Vatican Library to celebrate new collaboration (University of Notre Dame, April 28, 2016) – “The only such collaboration between Vatican Library and any North American academic institution, the agreement will develop visits and informal exchanges of faculty, scholars, librarians, and administrators; organize joint conferences, lecture series, art exhibitions, and musical and theatrical performances; and explore the development of joint programs of research.”
  • Remembering Archivist and Warsaw Ghetto Survivor Rose Klepfisz (Forward, April 15, 2016) – “The documents, kept in a warehouse in Brooklyn, were in such terrible shape that Rose had to bring a folding iron to work in order to smooth our the pages.”
  • 50,000 military records of Easter Rising and War of Independence released (IrishCentral, April 28, 2016) – “The military records of the 50,000 men and women who took part in the Easter Rising and the War of Independence are now available in the newly opened Military Archives at Cathal Brugha Barracks in Dublin.”
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International Archives and Archivist Weekly Roundup – April 15, 2016

Our weekly roundup of archives-related news from around the globe

 

 

International Archives and Archivists Weekly News Roundup – April 8, 2016

Our weekly roundup of archives-related news from around the globe

  • Double Agent Kim Philby Bragged of How Easy Spying Was in 1981 Lecture (New York Times, April 4, 2016) – “Kim Philby, the double agent whose betrayal of his country to the Soviet Union still marks British life, boasted in a 1981 lecture that was recently discovered by the BBC and broadcast on Monday of the ease with which he fooled a complacent establishment.”
  • U.S. will return stolen historical documents to Russia (Russia Beyond the Headlines, February 26, 2016) – “On March 3, 2016 the residence of the U.S. Ambassador in Moscow will host a ceremony in which the American authorities will return 28 historical documents from the 18th-20th centuries to the Russian government.”
  • Historic homecoming: US returns stolen artifacts to Russia (RT, March 3, 2016) – “American authorities returned 28 crucial historical documents dating back to the 18th-20th centuries to the Russian government on Thursday in an official ceremony held at the residence of the US Ambassador in Moscow.”
  • Russian Archive Chief Out After Debunking Soviet WWII Legend (RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty, March 17, 2016) – “The longtime director of the Russian State Archive has been removed from his post less than a year after he exposed a popular Soviet World War II legend to be “fiction” and railed against Soviet “myths” in front of top officials.”
  • Battle in the Archives – Uncovering Russia’s Secret Past (The Moscow Times, March 24, 2016) – “Whatever the truth, Mironenko’s exit marks the end of an era. His 24 years in charge of the state archive spanned modern Russian history. He arrived as an explosion of openness swept away the Soviet Union; he leaves amid fears that an increasingly nationalistic and authoritarian Kremlin is seeking to suppress uncomfortable truths in Russian and Soviet history.”
  • Keeping Russia’s history safe for the ages: Inside a Moscow archive (Russia Beyond the Headlines, February 23, 2016) – “The Russian State Archive of Ancient Documents in Moscow is the country’s primary repository of manuscripts and records dating back to the Middle Ages and beyond, but the story of the archive itself is not short of interest.”

Publications and Resources of Interest

  • A Glimpse into the Archives – An online exhibit from the United Nations Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals displaying documents from the International Criminal Tribunals in Rwanda (ICTR) and the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

International Archives and Archivists Weekly News Roundup – April 1, 2016

Our weekly roundup of archives-related news from around the globe