Weekly News Roundup – January 13, 2017

 

Our weekly roundup of archives-related news from around the globe.

  • Article focusing on the Syrian Archive, and initiative launched by a collective of human rights activists dedicated to preserving open source documentation relating to human rights violations and other crimes committed by all sides during the conflict in Syria. “Das Archiv der Kriegsverbrechen,” in: FAZ, December 28, 2016.
  • A new archives law in France grants the Red Cross a wide range of rights to access personal data in public records for tracing purposes.

New resources

  • Wiener TAU Archive Online – Supported by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany:  “We are pleased to announce the uploading of the “Online Wiener Archive” – the digitization project of Wiener Library for the Study of the Nazi Era and the Holocaust at Tel Aviv University, Supported by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany.
  • The project provides the public with online access to thousands of documents kept in the library’s archive. This documentation, collected by Dr. Alfred Wiener and his team before, during and after the Second World War and the Holocaust, includes official correspondences of the Nazi authorities in the 1930s and 1940s; official records from concentration camps; official records of Jewish organizations; personal letters which shed light on the condition of the Jews in occupied Europe and more (…)”
  • For more information, please visit https://en-cenlib.tau.ac.il/Wiener/Online_Wiener_Archive —Source: H Digital History.
  • France adds African perspective to colonial period archives: La Grande Collecte is France’s National Archives initiative to harvest documents and images held by individuals and families. The first stage was focused on World War I memorabilia. Now, “France’s National Archives have invited people in some 100 cities nationwide to donate memorabilia – such as letters, photos and notebooks – linked to France’s role in West Africa in the 19th and 20th century…. More than 350,000 documents were digitalised as a result and can now be consulted on their website. … it is definitely about providing an African perspective and as such they’re keen to work with archivists on the African continent. ” Source: H-HistBibl, original source: Alison Hird, RFI, November 21, 2016.

Calls for Papers

Deadline January 15th

  • The ICA Section on University and Research Institution Archives (SUV)
    is pleased to announce that its 2017 Conference will be in Riga,
    Latvia, in August 2017.

CULTURAL HERITAGE MATERIALS–UNIVERSITY, RESEARCH AND FOLKLORE
ARCHIVES IN THE 21ST CENTURY,

21 – 27 AUGUST 2017, RIGA LATVIA

2017 SUV conference calls for sessions or single paper proposals on
the following topics:

(1) CULTURAL HERITAGE MATERIALS: FOUNDATIONS AND DEFINITIONS

(2) BORN DIGITAL MATERIALS — APPRAISAL AND PROCESSING FOR SMALL
ARCHIVES

(3) DESCRIPTION AND USE OF ARCHIVES – RECORDS IN CONTEXT (RIC)
STANDARD

(4) RESPECTFUL STEWARDSHIP AND ENGAGEMENT WITH CREATOR COMMUNITIES

Abstracts and panel session proposals should be submitted to the ICA-SUV 2017 Conference Scientific Committee via email to:
gatis.karlsons@arhivi.gov.lv

by
JANUARY 15, 2017

Information on the full call for proposals and submission guidelines
is available on the website:

https://www.arhivi.gov.lv/news.aspx?groupId=7&id=121&y=2016&m=11

  • The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites proposals for its 2017 International Conference “Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies” that will be co- sponsored by the USC Mellon Digital Humanities Program

International Conference: “Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies”,  co-sponsored by the USC Mellon Digital Humanities Program
October 23-24, 2017 at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research (http://sfi.usc.edu/cagr) is dedicated to advancing new areas of interdisciplinary research on the Holocaust and other genocides. One of the Center’s primary research themes is Digital Genocide Studies. “Digital technologies have begun to significantly influence contemporary scholarship, theories, and methods in the social sciences and humanities. The USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites scholars from all disciplines to examine the relationships between digital methodologies, practices, ethics and contemporary Holocaust and genocide studies. How can digital humanities shape, challenge, or complement contemporary genocide studies and vice versa?

The two-day international conference “Digital Approaches to Genocide Studies” will be held on October 23-24, 2017 at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California. The conference will investigate the ways in which digital tools and methods, new media, and information technologies can help us to challenge conventional wisdom regarding Holocaust and Genocide Studies by raising new questions, improving our understanding, deepening our analysis, widening our field of view, or pioneering new approaches. Especially of interest would be how digital humanists from a range of disciplines and methodologies can broaden our methodological approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and prevention of genocide. (…)”

We welcome proposals for single paper presentations and for theme-specific panels comprising no more than three presenters.

Please send a CV and a one-page abstract of the proposed paper or an abstract of the proposed panel plus an abstract of each paper of the proposed panel before January 15, 2016 to cagr@usc.edu.

* Information Technologies Indigenous Communities & Australian Society of Archivists conference 2017

Join us for Diverse Worlds, the 2017 National Conference of the Australian Society of Archivists, held alongside the Information Technologies Indigenous Communities Symposium at the University of Melbourne, September 25-28. Please submit your proposal by completing the Call for Papers proposal form below.

The Call for Papers are now open and close on the 30 January, 2017.

We will be questioning the diversity of our collections, our profession and our audiences, as well as exploring the impact and potential of information technologies in Indigenous communities and on traditional knowledge.

https://www.archivists.org.au/learning-publications/2017-presenter-resources

  • The journal of the Australian Society of Archivists, Archives and Manuscripts, will produce a theme issue in November 2017.

The theme is RADICAL RECORDKEEPING

“The concept of radical recordkeeping is broad in scope: it can encompass recordkeeping of radical acts, as well as radical approaches for the formation and use of records and archives. Radical recordkeeping serves to disrupt traditional recordkeeping paradigms in revolutionary or profound ways using different approaches that inform practice, scholarship and teaching.”

Papers are due April 1st with a maximum 5000 word limit.

If you have any questions, please contact journaleditor@archivists.org.au

 

 

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